The restoration of the Raffles Institution building was completed around May 1837. On 15 September 1837, the Singapore Free School submitted a formal application to occupy the building. The trustees of the Raffles Institution accepted the proposal and the Singapore Free School moved into the Raffles Institution building, which was finally used as a school in December 1837.

 

(Source: http://eresources.nlb.gov.sg/history/events/
34e52586-72fa-4d0c-9551-a9fd86cb89ab)

 


 

Chung Hwa Girls’ School (name of school before 1987) was the first Chinese girls’ school established in Singapore. It was opened on 15 September 1911 in response to Dr Sun Yat-sen’s call for the provision of education for girls in Singapore. The establishment of a girls’ school in the early 20th century was a reflection of a turning point for women in the Chinese community in Singapore.

 



Singapore was founded by Sir Stamford Raffles in February 1819, and was administered from Fort Marlborough, Bencoolen, Sumatra, until June 1823. Thereafter Singapore was a dependency of Bengal until 1826, when it was amalgamated with Malacca and Penang to constitute the Presidency of the Straits Settlements. In 1946, the Straits Settlements was dissolved and Singapore became a Crown Colony and included the dependencies of Cocos Keeling Islands and Christmas Islands. On 15 September 1963, Singapore joined Malaya, Sarawak and British North Borneo to form Malaysia. On 9 August 1965, Singapore left Malaysia and became an independent Republic.

 


 

When the British troops withdrew from Singapore in 1971, the Singapore government took over the British Military Hospital after presenting a token of S$1 note in a frame to Britain. It was renamed Alexandra Hosptial and on 15 September 1971, it was officially opened to the public.

 


 

 

Merlion Park is home to the 8.6 metre-tall, water-spouting Merlion and her cub. The whimsical lion-headed, fish-tailed sculpture has been iconic to both locals and visitors since it was erected in the 1960s. On 15 September 1972, the park was officially opened at an installation ceremony of the statue, officiated by then Prime Minister of Singapore, Mr Lee Kuan Yew. The original Merlion statue used to stand at the mouth of the Singapore River, at the tip of the current The Fullerton Waterboat House Garden with Anderson Bridge as its background. The completion of the Esplanade Bridge, in 1997, blocked the views of the Merlion from the Marina Bay waterfront. So, in 2002, the statue and its cub were relocated 120 metres to the current Merlion Park that fronts Marina Bay where it stands on a newly reclaimed promontory in front of The Fullerton Hotel. The unprecedented feat of relocation began on 23 April 2002, and finished on 25 April. Exactly 30 years after it was officially launched, then-Senior Minister Lee Kuan Yew returned on 15 September 2002 to ceremonially welcome the Merlion again – this time in its new home (photo). A viewing deck now stretches over the Singapore River, allowing visitors to pose for a photograph with a front or side view of the Merlion, including a new city skyline backdrop in the picture. The sculpture was aligned to face East, a direction advised to be most auspicious.

 


 

LilliPutt was started in 2003, was temporarily shut down in 2006 when Big Splash was closed for renovations. It re-opened in February 2008. Originally located on the first storey, the indoor golf course cost almost $500,000 to relocate to the third storey. Their last day of operation was on 15 September 2016.