The first locally produced postwar Malay film, Seruan Merdeka (Cry of Freedom), is also believed to be the first political feature film. A promotional in The Singapore Free Press considers it Singapore’s “re-occupation first Malay film”, while The Straits Times advertises it as “the first story of the Malayan underground movement”. The film premiered at the Queens Theatre on the midnight of 16 August 1947. As Shaw Brothers and Cathay had monopoly over many cinemas in Malaya at the time, they set limitations on the screening of films made by other production houses. Seruan Merdeka, therefore, presumably did not get as wide a coverage as it should have; as a result, it was viewed as a failure.

 

(Source: http://eresources.nlb.gov.sg/history/events/
4f36251e-d62b-482c-b8d9-2da1f0ec56ea)

 


 

In 1953, Lee Kong Chian, a rubber tycoon donated a sum of $375,000 to establish a new public library. He made the donation with conditions that the library should house books on Asian Languages and cultures of Singapore. The new library was to be located at Stamford Road to the south of the Raffles Museum. Lee later laid the foundation stone of the new building on 16 August 1957. Raffles Library was renamed the Raffles National Library and then the National Library.

 


 

The racial riots on 21 July 1964 went down in Singapore's history as a cautionary tale of the fragility of race relations in Singapore. A holy day that was meant to celebrate Prophet Mohamad's birthday ended on a grim note for Singaporeans when the riots left 461 injured and 22 dead. It looked like the social fabric in Singapore was going to be torn apart without hope of being mended. The outbreak of the riots revealed that planning, clever use of the media and a well-colluded provocation caused the darkest suspicions and distrust among Singaporeans. On 16 August 1964, Racial Harmony Week was inaugurated to respond to the mayhem and put on notice that every race and religion mattered to the government and social inequities were to be addressed.

 


 

 

Seletar Institute (SI) was one of the four original centralised institutes (CI) in Singapore and one of the pre-university centres in Singapore that offers a three-year curriculum leading to the Singapore Cambridge (UCLES) General Certficate of Education Advanced Level examination. SI was established in 1988 and began operations in January 1989 at the then-vacant Upper Thomson Secondary School ex-campus at 14.5 km Upper Thomson Road, opposite Springleaf estate. On 16 August 1995, Ministry of Education announced tht SI will not be expectding any intake of prospective 'A' level students in the coming year of 1996. The institute was closed down and the campus abandoned, since 1998.