The 1603 naval battle off Changi was one of three naval confrontations between the Dutch and Portuguese that took place in the Johor River and Singapore Straits between 6 and 11 October 1603. The battle has its origins in the Santa Catarina incident that took place off the coast of Singapore on 25 February 1603. To punish the Johoreans for supporting the Dutch in the seizure of the richly-laden Santa Catarina merchant vessel, the governor of Malacca, André Furtado de Mendonça, sent a galleon and several smaller craft to the Johor River to harass the riverine towns and impose a blockade to cut off the upstream settlements. It was reported that the Portuguese had taken and occupied Johor Lama (the former capital of Johor) at the time.

 

(Source: http://eresources.nlb.gov.sg/history/
events/7a818ab0-2fec-4fe0-8cdc-9847e354c876)

 


 


Aleem Siddique Mosque was built as a recognition of Maulana Shah Muhammad Abdul Aleem Siddique’s (photo) immortal work of spreading the faith of Islam and the message of peace in Singapore and elsewhere around the world. Maulana Abdul Aleem Siddique, along with other Islamic activists, went on a mission to find a plot of land for the purpose of building a Mosque. They spotted an old surau (small place of prayers) at No. 90 Lorong K Telok Kurau (where the Mosque is right now). Maulana then urged the activists to raise the necessary funds to purchase the land and convert it to a Mosque. The land was conveyed on 25 February 1953 to Syed Ibrahim bin Oman Alsagoff, Ahmad bin Mohamed Ibrahim and Haji Adam Naina Mohamed Ibrahim as trustees of the All-Malaya Muslim Missionary Society (now known as JAMIYAH). The activists from the Society relentlessly raised funds and the Mosque, Masjid Abdul Aleem Siddique, was subsequently built on that plot of land.

 

(Source: http://www.aleemsiddique.org.sg/index.php?/
Info/about-abdul-aleem-siddique.html)

 


 

The full details of the new scheme were spelt out a few days later in an announcement on 25 February 1967. All 18 year old male Singapore citizens and permanent residents as well as civil servants and students would be called up for National Service. 10% would be called up for full-time training and after their full-time service they would return to civilian life but would be placed in the Reserve Service. The remainder would be called up for part-time service with the People's Defence Force, the Special Constabulary and the Vigilantes. The National Service (Amendment) Bill was tabled on 27 February 1967. The Parliament passed the Bill on 14 March 1967.